Solving error “AADSTS90013: Invalid input received from the user”

AADSTS90013: Invalid input received from the user. (header thumbnail)

I stumbled upon a customer, that complained about some pages in their intranet throwing weird errors with authentication. Those pages seemed to have one thing in common – there was a Yammer embed (or a SharePoint script webpart with Yammer embed script in it, to be precise) there. The error code they got was “AADSTS90013: Invalid input received from the user”.

AADSTS90013: Invalid input received from the user.

AADSTS90013: Invalid input received from the user.

Okay – this is going to be extremely specific, and probably won’t solve the issue for all of you out there! But this is what worked for this customer: Continue reading

Alternative Languages in SharePoint forcing the (cumbersome) use of localized Managed Properties

SharePoint Search No Results

Localization and multilingual environments in SharePoint are an endless source of interesting issues and blog post topics. In one case, we had a tenant created originally in English, and a site collection created in Finnish. In this particular case, SharePoint somehow messed up the language settings, and ended up requiring the use of localized managed properties on the search center of that site collection. That ended up being unexpected, unituitive and unusable for the end-users.

Description of the issue

Typically, when you use SharePoint Search, you can use managed properties to search for values in certain fields or columns of any items in the index. Our particular use case involved searching SharePoint’s people results for users of certain departments.

“Department” is a managed property on its own, and gets info from – surprise, surprise – a field called “Department” in the user profile service in SharePoint Online. In our case, the Search service API returned results with “Department:HR”, but search center did not. 

After a lot of playing around, it turned out the search center required us to use localized versions of the names of managed properties. In this particular case, search required the Finnish name (“Osasto”) for the property. Before this, I didn’t even know that was a thing! In all of the installations I’ve seen, the plain English internal names of the managed properties worked just fine – so, in this case, “Department”. Continue reading

Web part title changes not reflected to some users in multilingual SharePoint environment

SharePoint is not broken - it just does't work

​​When changing the web part title on a web part on a classic SharePoint page, changes seem to be saved for you. In reality, they are only reflected to some users.. And some users, on some devices, see the old title, whereas some see the new one. It’s a confusing situation and difficult to debug.

Why do web part titles get changed seemingly randomly?

Imagine this: You have a SharePoint environment, where you have multiple different languages set up. You also have users with multiple different workstation configurations – including multiple different languages. Different users, however, quite randomly see different revisions of web part titles in a very weird manner. This happens seemingly randomly even on new client devices, so no client-side caching is the reason.

This actually likely works as designed, it’s just kind of a confusing implementation. We’ve got Microsoft to blame for that, and their pretty bad documentation.. SharePoint actually localizes (and hence saves) Web part titles per-language.  Continue reading

4 ways to fix error AADSTS65001 (The user or administrator has not consented to use the application)

Azure AD Login error

Fixing issues with Azure AD authentication for Enterprise applications can be tricky. This article contains multiple different fixes to an issue, where granting admin consent has somehow failed. Not all of the different solutions will work for all situations, though! That’s why I included a couple of different options to try… 🙂

Why do you even get issues with Admin Consent (like AADSTS65001)?

Imagine this: You’re trying to add or use an app, but the requires such permissions from your tenant, that only an administrator can grant.

Typically to add this kind of an app, you’ll have to be a global administrator. If it’s an enterprise application, it could also be in an invalid state after someone tried adding the app without sufficient permissions.

Our investigation was focused on a mobile app, that’s deployed as an enterprise app. Most of the things should apply for web-based apps or console programs or whatever else you’re deploying, too.

The whole error might look something like this: Continue reading

How to solve errors about missing PnP Cmdlets on PowerShell

SharePoint PnP logo

This blog posts briefly describes how to solve some of the most typical errors about missing PnP Cmdlets when using Windows Powershell (or SharePoint Online Management Shell).

Symptoms

When trying to run some PnP-related cmdlet, you get an error similar to ones below:

Usually, this is luckily a simple fix!  Continue reading

Fixing the “For security reasons DTD is prohibited in this XML document.” issue

"For security reasons DTD is prohibited in this XML document. To enable DTD processing set the ProhibitDtd property on XmlReaderSettings to false and pass the settings into XmlReader.Create method."

This post describes a couple of ways to fix the issue “For security reasons DTD is prohibited in this XML document”. At least for me, it appeared when trying to access SharePoint Online using Powershell or a console program using OfficeDev.PnP (which in turn uses CSOM).

Error

When running any piece of code, whether in PowerShell, .exe console or anything else than in the code behind relies on .NET Framework, you get an error like this:

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Unorthodox configuration: How to use VLK and Click-to-run Office Apps side-by-side (Visio and Office 2016 as an example)

Ever had issues with different versions of Office programs not living in harmony together? Me too! This post describes how I was able to fix the issue and get Visio and Office 2016 of different installation types to play well together.

Preface

This blog post was inspired by my need to have Office 365 ProPlus (2016 versions) and Visio running side-by-side on my laptop. That turned out to be a lot more complicated than it arguably should be, so I documented the steps for further use. These instructions are written for that particular scenario (installing MS Visio on a machine with pre-existing Office 2016/365 ProPlus installation). My laptop is running Windows 10 Enterprise, which probably caused one of the issues I ran into.

Let’s get started!  Continue reading

Using SharePoint Search Query Tool

SharePoint Search Query Tool

If you’re working on SharePoint deployments, and aren’t familiar with SharePoint Search Query Tool, you’re probably doing something wrong. Or you’ve gotten a really troublefree tenant and simple requirements.. 🙂 At least for technical issues, it’s the #1 tool for debugging what’s in the index and what isn’t. This blog post describes how to use it to investigate SharePoint Online Search index issues.

This blog post is about using SharePoint Search Query Tool to investigate search index issues in SharePoint Online. First of all, you can get the tool from here: https://sp2013searchtool.codeplex.com/.

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Fixing the “Could not load file or assembly … or one of its dependencies” error

Visual Studio logo

This post describes how to fix the “Could not load file or assembly ‘<assemblyname>’ or one of its dependencies. An attempt was made to load a program with an incorrect format.” error. 

Problem

Especially while installing a new dev machine, and building your project for the first time, you may end up getting the following exception:

No fear, though, as this is usually easily fixed. In quite a few cases, it’s simply a mismatch between architectures and easily changed.

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Fixing Lenovo T460S Wifi connectivity issues (removing the evil versions of Intel Dual Bank Wireless-AC 8260 driver)

I recently received a new work laptop – Lenovo T460S. A cute little thing with impressive performance and reasonably good battery life. However, what people frequently complaing about online in regards of this laptop, is its absolutely, horribly awful wifi. This, in turn, is probably caused by it’s bad wifi chip, Intel Dual Bank Wireless-AC 8260. And they’re right – it’s a load of crap.

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