Unorthodox configuration: How to use VLK and Click-to-run Office Apps side-by-side (Visio and Office 2016 as an example)

Ever had issues with different versions of Office programs not living in harmony together? Me too! This post describes how I was able to fix the issue and get Visio and Office 2016 of different installation types to play well together.

Preface

This blog post was inspired by my need to have Office 365 ProPlus (2016 versions) and Visio running side-by-side on my laptop. That turned out to be a lot more complicated than it arguably should be, so I documented the steps for further use. These instructions are written for that particular scenario (installing MS Visio on a machine with pre-existing Office 2016/365 ProPlus installation). My laptop is running Windows 10 Enterprise, which probably caused one of the issues I ran into.

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Powershell Error: Cannot uninstall the LanguagePack 0 because it is not deployed.

Powershell: languagepack 0

Thi s post offers a solution to the very non-descriptive SharePoint error message “Cannot uninstall the LanguagePack 0 because it is not deployed”, which might appear while trying to update a wsp solution.

Symptoms

Assume you’re trying to install, update or uninstall a SharePoint solution (.wsp package) using PowerShell-commands Install-SPSolution, Update-SPSolution or Uninstall-SPSolution (respectively). Operation fails with the following (or similar) error:

I have actually seen this also in the form of “Cannot uninstall Language Pack 0 because it is not deployed”, but I think the other form of the error is the one that pops up in the PowerShell.

Powershell: languagepack 0

In Central Admin the solution is in Error state.

151117_ca

Solution

You can find quite a lot of solutions online, but they weren’t really working for me. I tried restarting services, removing the package and meddling with the dll-files, but to no avail. However, the actual “last operation details” on the CA page hinted that the problem was in fact in one of the features. The feature in question included some content types, and toying around with them is like playing baseball with hand grenades, so you have to tread carefully in cases like these.

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The specified path, file name, or both are too long. The fully qualified file name must be less than 260 characters, and the directory name must be less than 248 characters.

Too long deployment path

This post describes a few different ways of fixing the error “The specified path, file name, or both are too long. The fully qualified file name must be less than 260 characters, and the directory name must be less than 248 characters.” one can get when trying to package/publish a SharePoint solution, web site or Azure Webjob.

UPDATE 11.4.2016: I actually got this nasty exception on another occasion (Azure webjob publish), so I updated the text accordingly.

Symptoms

Visual Studio throws the following error when packaging a SharePoint solution to a .wsp file, OR when deploying or publishing your web project (for example Azure Webjob).

 

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