Debugging. Yeah, that's roughly what the process looks like. With all those tiny symbols and all. Debug/Trace/Whatever.

Adding Debug listeners to your console application fails in .NET Core

Every now and then comes the need to write your console output to a log file. There’s a simple way to do this in .NET Framework, and quite a few online articles detailing a borderline one-liner on how to do achieve it: Adding a log file listener(s) by calling Debug.Listeners – something like this: TextWriterTraceListener tr1 = new TextWriterTraceListener(System.Console.Out); Debug.Listeners.Add(tr1);   TextWriterTraceListener tr2 = new TextWriterTraceListener(System.IO.File.CreateText("Output.txt")); Debug.Listeners.Add(tr2); Source However, this doesn’t work in .NET Core anymore. Problem: Everything changes in .NET Core Using the code…Continue reading Adding Debug listeners to your console application fails in .NET Core

Console output copypaste

How to output console or PowerShell transcript to a file in Windows

Every now and then, you run into a situation, where you’ll need to somehow dump the console output (or transcript) of running a console application. I’m actually going to argue it happens a lot more often than one would think – in my case, any time a customer requires a webjob or a function, that one would normally deploy to Azure, being ran on the servers of the customer. This post describes how to do that. Problem Something breaks or the app crashes, and the…Continue reading How to output console or PowerShell transcript to a file in Windows